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1. Introduction
  1. Risk Management

  2. Who Are You, and Why Are You Here?

  3. Finding a Solution

2. Problem Definition
  1. What Needs Protecting?

  2. Who is Allowed Where?

3. Methods of Identification
  1. Reliability vs. Cost

  2. Combining Methods to Increase Reliability

  3. Security System Management

4. Access Control
  1. What You Have

  2. What You Know

  3. Who You Are

5. Other Security Systems Elements

  1. Building Design

  2. Piggybacking and Tailgating: Mantraps

  3. Camera Surveillance

  4. Security Guards

  5. Sensors and Alarms

  6. Visitors

6. The Human Element
  1. People: The Weakest Link

  2. People: The Strongest Backup

7. Site Design
  1. Layers

  2. Components

  3. Tactics

8. Controlling Site Access
  1. Entry Control Facility

  2. Zones of an Entry Control Facility

  3. Utilities and Automatition

9. Chosing the Right Solution
  1. Risk Tolerance vs. Cost

  2. Security System Design Considerations

  3. Building Security Design Considerations

“What You Know”

Keypads and coded locks are in wide use as a method of access control. They are reliable and very user friendly, but their security is limited by the sharable and guessable nature of passwords. They have familiar phone-like buttons where users punch in a code — if the code is unique to each user it’s called a personal access code (PAC) or personal identification number (PIN). Keypad generally implies the ability to accept multiple codes, one for each user; coded lock usually refers to a device having only one code that everyone uses.

The security level of keypads and coded locks can be increased by periodically changing codes, which requires a system for informing users and disseminating new codes. Coded locks that don’t have their code changed will need to have their keypad changed periodically if a detectable pattern of wear develops on the keys. As with access cards, keypad security can be increased by adding a biometric to confirm user identity.

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